Smithsonian Goes Mass Market

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I have a forthcoming piece on QVC, which means I've been spending a lot of time keeping current on home shopping news.  I have become a huge fan of the Home Shopping Queen, who displays an astonishing breadth of knowledge of all things home shopping, and does a yeoman's job keeping abreast of the news.

That's where I caught this little tidbit:  the Smithsonian is licensing its jewelry collection to QVC.  Now you, too, can own your own copy of the Hope diamond, done in authentic Diamonique simulated diamond, and available on five easy payments of $15.47.

Actually, I think it's nice--and yes, I also approve of those machines that let you have a canvas replica of a Monet for $150.  Why shouldn't people have beautiful replicas in their homes?  Allowing the American public to enjoy a little piece of their national museum seems like a nice alternative to just raising their taxes.


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Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

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