Your daily Andy Rooney Moment

Why are there so many networks devoting half of their coverage to weddings?  Don't get me wrong, I love weddings.  But I like watching weddings because I know the people involved.  I've got a team to root for.

Okay, I admit that when we were moving last fall, I briefly became addicted to Bridezillas.  I needed the reminder that there is actually something worse than moving:  planning a big wedding.  But that cannot be the general explanation for the plethora of wedding based shows that now seems to dominate two or three television networks at least 50% of the time.

I presume that the demographic is mostly women still young enough to fantasize about dressing up like a meringue and blowing the cost of a luxury car on a six-hour party.  The "pre-married", let's call them.  But are enough of them interested in watching other peoples' wedding disasters to support simultaneous programming on three networks?  And how many of them are home right now, when I am observing this phenomenon?

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Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

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