Will Cap And Trade Raise The Income Tax By 50 Percent?

More

Martin Feldstein got kicked around the blogosphere a couple of weeks ago for an op-ed in the Washington Post arguing against cap-and-trade legislation. (See, eg, David Roberts, Matt Yglesias, Mark Thoma, Paul Krugman, Daniel Drezner and Henry Farrell.) Upping the ante, I see Feldstein's now gone and published an even longer version of the exact same argument in the current issue of the Weekly Standard.

The portion of Feldstein's argument that had to do with international relations -- basically, that the US shouldn't act on climate change without extracting similar agreements from China and India -- got picked over pretty well last time around. But the rest of Felstein's argument -- basically, that cap and trade would impose a huge cost on the average American family -- is worth noting:

Jump to comments
Presented by

Derek Thompson is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about economics, labor markets, and the entertainment business.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Is Technology Making Us Better Storytellers?

How have stories changed in the age of social media? The minds behind House of Cards, This American Life, and The Moth discuss.


Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A Short Film That Skewers Hollywood

A studio executive concocts an animated blockbuster. Who cares about the story?

Video

In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

Video

What Is a Sandwich?

We're overthinking sandwiches, so you don't have to.

Video

How Will Climate Change Affect Cities?

Urban planners and environmentalists predict the future of city life.

Video

The Inner Life of a Drag Queen

A short documentary about cross-dressing, masculinity, identity, and performance

Video

Let's Talk About Not Smoking

Why does smoking maintain its allure? James Hamblin seeks the wisdom of a cool person.

Writers

Up
Down

More in Business

Just In