Memento Mori

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This Nick Gillespie post on the probably-doomed Chrysler-Fiat deal reminds me of the Chrysler Cordoba, which he uses to illustrate Chrysler's many problems:




Reminds me, I say, because this is the car the McArdle family drove.  Though not in 1975.  The McArdle family does not buy new cars.  Buying new cars causes hair to grow on your palms.  No, my family drove this car when I was in high school in the late 1980s.  Needless to say, I was, like, the only kid in America who never wanted to borrow the family car.

On the other hand, I do credit the Chrysler Cordoba, with it's "thickly crucial luxury of seats available in soft Corinthian leather" for ensuring that I passed my driver's test on the first go.  In 1975, it may have been "the small Chrysler", but a decade and a half later, it was about as zippy and manoeuverable as the Love Boat.  After that, parallel parking a regular car was as easy as falling off one of the soft corinthian leather bucket seats.

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Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

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