MBAs Return to Their Roots

More

The Wall Street Journal reports that MBAs, unable to find the lucrative jobs in consulting and finance that they paid big bucks to access, are going back to whatever it was they used to do. 


That's what happened to my class in 2001 -- though not to me, because I'd come from the one field, technology consulting, that was doing worse than finance or management consulting.  I did sniff around to see if there were any jobs available, but as one recruiter pointed out, my skills were two years old, and the market was glutted.  "Find a nice guy," he advised, "and have his babies."

But even those who can return to the mother ship are usually more than a little embittered by the experience.  Most people get an MBA because they want to switch fields.  Paying $80-$100,000 for a promotion is a pretty hard pill to swallow.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Is Technology Shifting Our Moral Compass?

"The experience of taking another human life becomes much more trivial."


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Juice Cleanses: The Worst Diet

A doctor tries the ever-popular Master Cleanse. Sort of.

Video

Why Did I Study Physics?

Using hand-drawn cartoons to explain an academic passion

Video

What If Emoji Lived Among Us?

A whimsical ad imagines what life would be like if emoji were real.

Video

Living Alone on a Sailboat

"If you think I'm a dirtbag, then you don't understand the lifestyle."

Feature

The Future of Iced Coffee

Are artisan businesses like Blue Bottle doomed to fail when they go mainstream?

Writers

Up
Down

More in Business

Just In