Pigeons on the pill

I just heard a Hollywood city planner talking about this program to distribute birth control to their pigeons.  Apparently, the program is a roaring success--the pigeon population appears to have plummeted to less than 10% of its previous level.  Does this mean that we'll soon see cityscapes denuded of pigeons?  I can't say that I'd miss them terribly--I remember too well how my best friend and I would run as fast as we could under the el tracks on the way to school, for fear that one of the approximately one squillion pigeons that nested there would nail us with its droppings.  But do pigeons perform any sort of valuable service in the urban ecosystem?

Update:  JP Freire has some thoughts.  "Every pigeon a wanted pigeon" . . . what a beautiful thought.

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Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

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