An immigration story

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A friend sends me this, which I urge you to read in full (the point of the story is in the details).

Ex-UI researcher faces deportation

Katarzyna Dziewanowska grew up in the "gray communist life" of Poland. But it was in America where she found a truly nightmarish experience with a bureaucracy. After nearly 14 years as a researcher at the University of Idaho, Dziewanowska has been denied permanent residency by U.S. immigration officials, who say she worked without authorization for eight months. She did that, she and her attorneys say, on the advice of the UI, and she quit working for a time when the university advised her to do so.

But her appeals have fallen on deaf ears with immigration officials. She'd like to take the case before an immigration judge, but that could take months or years. In the meantime, she can't work and has no legal residency status. Because it is a family application, her husband - a UI researcher studying a promising treatment of retroviruses - can no longer receive grants. Her son can't apply for a free-tuition program through his employer.

"She has no legal status," said Michael Cherasia, her former attorney. "She's not able to legally work. Certainly she can't continue to do her research. (Agents) could come to her door any morning, arrest her, detain her and ship her out of the country."

As I say, read the whole thing. Look at what she was researching. Look at her standing in her field. Look at why she now faces deportation.

One thing to say, no doubt, is that Dziewanowska broke the rules. By their lights, the authorities did nothing improper. Also, it seems odd to me that she and more particularly her employer did not see fit to hire a lawyer until it was too late. This is America. You do nothing without a lawyer. But this does not subtract much from the insane disproportion of the outcome--from her point of view, from her family's, and not least from that of the US. What made me groan out loud was the meaningless glitch that ordained it: an application was rejected twice because a photo was not up to specification, in the second case because of glare on a lens of her glasses. From this, the rest followed. Two "rejections", no appeal, life squashed. You have a problem with that?

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