No credit? No sale.

I find this commercial fascinating:



Fascinating, I mean, in the same way that I find it fascinating to contemplate obscenely large rare tumors preserved in formaldehyde. You know, I care about good credit and all, but I am not under the illusion that if my credit suffers, I will have to move into my parents' basement; presumably I will still have income. And I'm pretty repulsed by the notion that the proper response to finding out that your betrothed has bad credit is obviously to break up with them. "I was preparing to go with that richer/poorer, better/worse thing, but I didn't realize that meant paying higher interest rates on my auto loan!"

I mean, yes, you should be very wary of getting into a relationship with someone who is financially irresponsible. But those sorts of things usually manifest themselves in ways other than a shoddy credit report. The first time you go over to their place and notice that they have no electricity in the middle of a fine, sunny day--that is probably the time to start asking questions, not three weeks before the wedding.

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Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

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