Live or recorded?

I'm with Ogged:

People go to concerts to feel the vibrations in their bones, to feel the energy of the interaction of the band and the crowd, to watch the performers play, and, ultimately, to feed their will to power get laid achieve zen. But the music sounds worse. It's too loud, or you can't hear it, or it's garbled, or mixed improperly, or the performer is having an off night, or...always something. If I want an "experience," I might go to a concert, but if I want to actually hear music, I'll put on a CD.

I'm always torn. On the one hand, I have a perforated eardrum, which makes it physically painful to get too close to the speakers; also, I have a lot of friends who like to stand very close to the speakers.

On the other hand, I like watching people perform. And my living room is not big enough to hold a mosh pit, as we discovered at my housewarming.

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Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

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