Miss Daisy, driving

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Another thing I'm learning, as I research this article, is that old people are extraordinarily bad drivers; per mile travelled, a driver over 75 is more dangerous than a driver 15-24. By 2030, it's thought that seniors will be responsible for 25% of all auto accidents.

So one has to wonder, how come the AARP has its own discount insurance plan? It's as if The Hartford, which offers it, had found a vast pool of bad drivers, and decided to offer them a bonus for signing on. The program offers no insurance penalty for the first accident, which must be welcome news to seniors, since apparently they generally don't decide to get off the road until they've had at least a couple of fender-benders.

I presume it must be a combination of volume, and desireable demographics. Anyone have any ideas?

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Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

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