Bertrand Russell

  • Is a Permanent Peace Possible?
    Berliner Verlag/Archiv/Picture-Alliance/DPA/AP

    Is a Permanent Peace Possible?

    The fighting in Europe prompted a noted British philosopher and pacifist to trace the “cruel absurdities” that had produced a world war—and to hope for peaceful means to settle future disputes.

  • The Secret to World Peace

    Nations must give up their absolute sovereignty over foreign affairs.

  • The Future of Man

    British philosopher and mathematician who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950, BERTRAND RUSSELL, in the paper that follows, calmly examines three foreseeable possibilities for the human race. In 1920 he paid a brief visit to Russia; he talked with Lenin and with other leaders, and what he saw of the government did not impress him favorably. He has been a frequent visitor to the United States and, while sometimes critical of us, he admits some hope for our way of doing things.

  • Education as a Political Institution

    "Education should not aim at a dead awareness of static facts, but at an activity directed toward the world that our efforts are to create."

Video

Riding Unicycles in a Cave

"If you fall down and break your leg, there's no way out."

Video

Carrot: A Pitch-Perfect Satire of Tech

"It's not just a vegetable. It's what a vegetable should be."

Video

An Ingenious 360-Degree Time-Lapse

Watch the world become a cartoonishly small playground

Video

The Benefits of Living Alone on a Mountain

"You really have to love solitary time by yourself."

Video

The Rise of the Cat Tattoo

How a Brooklyn tattoo artist popularized the "cattoo"

Writers

Up
Down

Just In