Bertrand Russell

  • Is a Permanent Peace Possible?
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    Is a Permanent Peace Possible?

    The fighting in Europe prompted a noted British philosopher and pacifist to trace the “cruel absurdities” that had produced a world war—and to hope for peaceful means to settle future disputes.

  • The Secret to World Peace

    Nations must give up their absolute sovereignty over foreign affairs.

  • The Future of Man

    British philosopher and mathematician who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950, BERTRAND RUSSELL, in the paper that follows, calmly examines three foreseeable possibilities for the human race. In 1920 he paid a brief visit to Russia; he talked with Lenin and with other leaders, and what he saw of the government did not impress him favorably. He has been a frequent visitor to the United States and, while sometimes critical of us, he admits some hope for our way of doing things.

  • Education as a Political Institution

    "Education should not aim at a dead awareness of static facts, but at an activity directed toward the world that our efforts are to create."

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