Alan Taylor

Alan Taylor is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Photo section.

  • A Year of War Completely Destroyed the Donetsk Airport
    Dmitry Lovetsky/AP

    A Year of War Completely Destroyed the Donetsk Airport

    In Donetsk, in eastern Ukraine, the Sergey Prokofiev International Airport has been reduced from a modern transportation hub to piles of scorched rubble in less than a year of warfare.

  • The 2015 Sony World Photography Awards
    Wojciech Kruczynski, Poland, Shortlist, Panoramic, Open, 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

    The 2015 Sony World Photography Awards

    The Sony World Photography Awards, an annual competition hosted by the World Photography Organisation, just announced its shortlist of winners. This year's contest attracted 173,444 entries from 171 countries.

  • Investigating the Mysteries of Antarctica
    Natacha Pisarenko/AP

    Investigating the Mysteries of Antarctica

    Every year, thousands of scientists come to Antarctica for research. For a dozen days in January, in the middle of the chilly Antarctic summer, the Associated Press, including photographer Natacha Pisarenko, followed scientists from different fields on the frozen continent.

  • Watching a Shaky Cease-Fire in Ukraine
    Vadim Ghirda/AP

    Watching a Shaky Cease-Fire in Ukraine

    Earlier this month, a cease-fire agreement was signed in Minsk, Belarus, after long talks between leaders of Russia, Ukraine, Germany, and France. Heavy fighting ensued right before the deadline, and sporadic violence continues even now, more than a week later.

  • Okayama's Naked Festival
    Trevor Williams/Getty Images

    Okayama's Naked Festival

    Every year in Okayama, Japan, nearly 10,000 men take part in the Hadaka Matsuri, or Naked Festival at Saidaiji Temple. The men, dressed in Japanese loincloths, battle to grab a pair of lucky talismans thrown into the crowd by priests. Participants in the boisterous event are asked to prepare papers with their name, blood type and emergency contact number, and tuck them into their loincloths beforehand.

  • Photos of the Week: 2/14-2/20
    AP Photo/Grand Teton National Park, Jackie Skaggs

    Photos of the Week: 2/14-2/20

    ​This week we have images of Beluga whales in Vladivostok, speleotherapy deep below Belarus, the Maha Shivaratri festival in India, the Chinese Lunar New Year, a partially-frozen Niagara Falls, a "Wearable Tomato" robot in Japan, and much more.

  • Around the Solar System
    Reuters/NASA

    Around the Solar System

    Robotic probes launched by NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), and others are gathering information all across the solar system. We currently have spacecraft in orbit around the Sun, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, a comet, and Saturn, and two operational rovers on Mars.

  • Carnival 2015, Part II: Mardi Gras and More
    Jonathan Bachman/Reuters

    Carnival 2015, Part II: Mardi Gras and More

    Carnival season 2015 is wrapping up, and colorful images from Europe and the Americas keep coming in. Collected here are more photos from just the past few days of Mardi Gras and Carnival festivities in New Orleans, Rio, Belgium, Panama, Germany, France, and more.

  • What Record-Breaking Snow Really Looks Like
    Brian Snyder/Reuters

    What Record-Breaking Snow Really Looks Like

    In the past month, a series of snowstorms and Arctic weather fronts have brought bone-chilling temperatures and record-setting snowfall levels to the Northeastern United States. New England has been especially hard-hit, with parts of Massachusetts and Maine recording more than 100 inches of snow this season.

  • Carnival 2015 Around the World
    Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images

    Carnival 2015 Around the World

    Carnival season 2015 is underway across Europe and the Americas. These pre-Lent festivals, often a blend of local pagan and catholic traditions, usher out the winter and welcome in spring. The largest and most famousthe Carnival in Rio de Janeiro, Braziltook place this weekend.

  • Photos of the Week: 2/7-2/13
    Henning Kaiser/AFP/Getty Images

    Photos of the Week: 2/7-2/13

    This week we have photos of the continued eruptions of Mount Sinabung in Indonesia, a drone interceptor designed to capture other drones, the Quebec Winter Carnival ice canoe race, an orange toxic cloud in Spain, devastating drought in Brazil, Buddhist monks at play with tigers in Thailand, the launch of a Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket, and much more.

  • Remembering Dresden: 70 Years After the Firebombing

    Remembering Dresden: 70 Years After the Firebombing

    In the last months of World War II, Allied bombers conducted several major bombing raids on the eastern German city of Dresden. Beginning on the night of February 13, 1945, more than 1,200 heavy bombers dropped nearly 4,000 tons of high-explosive and incendiary bombs on the city in four successive raids.

  • Asylum Seekers Flood Into Hungary
    Laszlo Balogh/Reuters

    Asylum Seekers Flood Into Hungary

    The European Union is experiencing a steep rise in the number of Kosovar citizens smuggling themselves into the affluent bloc in search of a better life, with 23,000 migrants reaching Hungary in the first six weeks of 2015, compared to 6,000 for the whole of 2013.

  • Zoo Security Drills: When Animals Escape
    China Daily/Reuters

    Zoo Security Drills: When Animals Escape

    In some zoos in Japan and China, staff members perform regular security drills to practice their response to a large animal escape by using costumed zookeepers as the fugitive animals. Individuals in furry costumes or pairs in full-size mockups of larger animals run through zoo property, sometimes inflicting mock injuries, as fellow zookeepers work to surround, subdue, and recapture them.

  • Human Landscapes of Canada
    Google, Inc.

    Human Landscapes of Canada

    Canada is a massive country, yet it has one of the lowest population densities in the world. Despite this, Canadians have made a wide impact on their land, much of it visible from aerial and satellite photography. Hydroelectric facilities, roads, mines, farms, ports, resource exploration, logging, canals, cities, and towns have altered much of the landscape over the years.

  • Photos of the Week: 1/31-2/6
    Fabrice Wislez/AP

    Photos of the Week: 1/31-2/6

    This week, we have photos of a device made for snorting cocoa powder, rescue efforts in Taipei after a plane crash, French twins who suffer from Xeroderma Pigmentosum, ruins of a sunken town re-emerging from a reservoir during Brazil's drought, demolition of Candlestick Park, a light festival in Belgium, people in Japan trying to catch lucky beans during "Mame-maki," and much more.

  • On This Day 150 Years Ago: A Portrait of President Abraham Lincoln
    Library of Congress/Alexander Gardner/AP

    On This Day 150 Years Ago: A Portrait of President Abraham Lincoln

    On February 5, 1865, 150 years ago Thursday, President Abraham Lincoln, age 55, sat in the Washington, D.C. studio of photographer Alexander Gardner, posing for a portrait photo.

  • Caught in the Crossfire in Eastern Ukraine
    Evgeniy Maloletka/AP

    Caught in the Crossfire in Eastern Ukraine

    Battles in eastern Ukraine have surged anew, with the civilian population suffering dozens of deaths from ongoing rocket attacks.

  • Body Modifiers
    Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters

    Body Modifiers

    Humans have been altering their bodies permanently for thousands of years. Tattoos, piercings, and scarification have been practiced to demonstrate tribal allegiances, to show a life history, to say a constant prayer, to give a warning, or simply to act as an amazing work of art.

  • On This Day: Einstein and Chaplin Attend a Premiere in 1931

    On This Day: Einstein and Chaplin Attend a Premiere in 1931

    Eighty-four years ago, on February 2, 1931, the world-famous film star Charlie Chaplin attended the premiere of his newest film City Lights in Los Angeles accompanied by his guests of honor: the world-famous physicist Albert Einstein, and his wife, Elsa Einstein.

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

Video

What Fifty Shades Left Out

A straightforward guide to BDSM

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